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View Full Version : Iraq to Spend $500m to Stimulate Agriculture



MSGDay
10-17-2011, 11:36 AM
Posted on 13 October 2011.
http://www.iraq-businessnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/10/agriculture-farming-tractor-photo-credit-Hinrich.jpg?d9c344
The Iraqi Agriculture Ministry wants to spend more than 600 billion IQD ($500 million) to build modern agricultural villages in order to stimulate the Iraqi agricultural sector.
According to the report from AKnews, 20 billion IQD will be spent on average for each village in the provinces of Najaf, Anbar, Nineveh, Babil, Salahaddin and Baghdad; two villages in Diwaniyah and Karbala have already been completed.
“The project will be completed by 2015,” promised Deputy Agriculture Minister Mahdi Damad al-Qaisi.
The Iraqi agriculture industry is suffering because of a two-year drought and farmers who are unable to compete with cheap imported products and therefore reluctant to farm.
The government tried to address the issue in January 2010 with a law for modern agricultural villages which mandated the Agriculture Ministry to determine suitable sites for the villages and to construct housing units.
These villages are supposed to be equipped with developed mechanisms to improve the agricultural situation, such as irrigation systems. Also, a loan system shall be available for farmers.
(Source: AKnews)

Ztripe
10-22-2011, 03:24 AM
Iraq is amazingly irrigated and green compared to, say, the UAE.

I wonder if, with sufficient irrigation a recurring rain cycle could be lured into the areas where there seems to be no rain. It isn't like the latitude is the problem. It's the surrounding topography, I would imagine, that makes it so arid. But, with continuous and aggressive irrigation, preferably solar-powered, could a rain cycle be returned to a region?

from bustoursmagazine.com:

"Despite its Dust Bowl image, Oklahoma has more man-made lakes than any other state in the nation. The state’s shoreline totals almost as much as the Atlantic, Pacific, Gulf and Arctic Coasts combined. In fact, the Grand Lake O’ The Cherokees has more miles of shoreline than the coast of California."

Oklahoma decided it wasn't going to have another dust bowl. I know irrigation plays a big part, but Tulsa has no lack of rain, snow, or humidity.

Could the deserts of the world be systematically attacked and reclaimed?

MSGDay
10-22-2011, 12:14 PM
Interesting question.
How about nuclear powered desalinization plants to convert sea water to fresh for drinking and irrigating? What a massive change that might make to the world in general.

Recently read an article where private companies are going to build a huge desalinization plant in Baja California to provide water for Southern California.

Angriff
10-22-2011, 05:22 PM
Recently read an article where private companies are going to build a huge desalinization plant in Baja California to provide water for Southern California.

I saw something about this on TV. They were explaining how difficult it is to turn sea water into fresh water, and then began interviewing someone about this massive water treatment plant you're talking about.