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Thread: Range OPORD/ Procedures

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    Default Range OPORD/ Procedures

    I am an ROTC Cadet, and my Battalion has a rifle familiarization and qualification coming up in the near future, I was selected as the Cadet OIC and am required to create a Range OPORD for the training event, I have been looking for a template or some sort to get an idea of how to complete one correctly but am having some trouble. I also will be required to create a VIP Brief in the event a ranking officer attends. Can anyone provide any incite on this matter? If so, I would greatly appreciate it!

    Thank you in advance.

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    Senior Member StayFrosty's Avatar
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    Knock out your risk assessment early, and go over it ad infinitum with whoever your unit OIC is. Better yet, identify your RSO and delegate the task.

    Edited to add: (I'm assuming you know what Composite Risk Management is... they will expect to see that) Also, identify your personnel (lane safeties, your rso, do you have an NCOIC? ammo detail, ammo handlers, et al) early, and let them get started. Remember your 1/3rd- 2/3rds and give them enough time with solid direction and a knowledge of your intent and endstate to allow them to succeed at what you're asking of them.

    Start tentative planning on the schedule - how many personnel, how long to fire, what's reasonable for day-by-day?

    Do you have an OPORD shell/template?

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    That is correct, I do know what a Composite Risk Management is; I have those personnel selected and there is an NCOIC, he is the one who wants me to complete these orders as he stated I will be doing this often as a new 2LT and wants me to gain the experience early. What specifically should be completed for ammo detail (I have a total ammo count for what we were issued, and events we will be conducting, would that just be how much ammo will be distributed to each individual for each event?) I do have an OPORD template from previous orders I have completed, but I did not know if Range Orders were any different as far as information that must be included. Also, do you have any knowledge on "VIP Briefings" or know what they are?

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    Moderator MSG Glenn's Avatar
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    There used to be OPORD templates here -
    Army OPORDs

    And some basic OPORD info here -
    The Operation Order - OPORD (ArmyStudyGuide.com)

    Both of which you're probably familiar with.

    As far as range-specific OPORDs I tried digging up some of my old ones but couldn't find them offhand. I may have given them to my son, an Army Ranger. If I find them soon I'll let you know.
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    Junior Member D.S.11B's Avatar
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    You can do the CRM yourself, but won't your battalion commander provide the assessment given the Fam. Fire and Qualification warrants a moderate risk assessment and needs O-5 approval? I am guessing they just want to see that you know how to complete a risk assessment matrix.

    Since you've got a relatively unskilled (no offense) bunch of firers, you need to limit how much ammunition you are going to allow for grouping and zeroing, lest you be on the zero range ALL day or use up all your ammo before you get to the qualification lanes. Like StayFrosty said, you need to delegate tasks. I've found it is the most efficient on the zero range when each firer goes to the line with one magazine and 18 rounds (you may want to provide 3 10round clips instead of 18 rounds) and have each firer load their own magazine in between iterations. An Ammo detail NCOIC can make sure that the ammo detail keeps the firing line supplied with ammunition.

    How many people are firing? Can your S-4 get you front sight post adjustment tools? If you have 40 firers and 1 tool, you are going to need some nails or multi-pliers in order to adjust everyone's sights without taking all day. Eye pro/ear pro?

    You need to find out if you have any prior service guys in your battalion. They can provide PMI or marksmanship basics, as well as concurrent training of the fundamentals to those cadets who are waiting in the bleachers for their turn on the zero range. Emphasize safety, IE knowing your target and what is beyond it, muzzle awareness, finger off the trigger, etc etc. Having concurrent training going on keeps things fresh in the minds of those about to fire, and it keeps people from screwing around, getting hurt, safety violations, etc

    As far as your briefing, see if you can find out who you may be briefing (A full colonel, a CSM, etc along with their name(s)). You'll want to address them specifically, and by rank without leaving anyone out, because they tend to get butthurt. "Good morning Colonel SoandSo and CSM HeyYou" Then, cover the purpose and scope of what you are doing. "This is an unclassified briefing on XXX Battalion's Range day, and during this briefing I'll discuss this, this, and this, and Cadet HighSpeed will be covering safety (for example), as he is our Range Safety and subject matter expert. For the main part of the brief, discuss your timeline, what you plan to accomplish, have a map or a sandtable if necessary, and be prepared for them to ask you questions. Close your brief by ASKING for questions, and restating your goal (100% first time go on qualification)
    Last edited by D.S.11B; 04-11-2011 at 03:28 PM. Reason: typographical error

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    Moderator MSG Glenn's Avatar
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    Almost forgot:
    You can find info on briefings here -

    http://www.uc.edu/armyrotc/ms2text/M...y_Briefing.pdf
    Proud Dad of a US Army Airborne Ranger SFC
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    Senior Member StayFrosty's Avatar
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    Where are you drawing ammo from? Who will be bringing it to the range? (two questions to know EARLY)

    Ammo detail is nothing special, but you should have plans for how you plan to turn that from boxed/crated ammo into loaded mags... ammo handlers, on the other hand, usually have to be certified by the post to draw ammo. Just check with your NCO to make sure that doesn't become a hurdle for you.

    Have you contacted Range Control - gone through their RSO/OIC class, asked them what's required to open their ranges? (I realize I'm not getting on the OPORD, but just things to remember).

    OPORD:

    Just like any other mission. Some are static defense, some are raids, some are pushing a public affairs message, some are getting your battalion qualified. Any particular paragraph that you're struggling with maknig fit your range?

    VIP brief:

    Be ready to brief your progress and spin it to make it sound good (it helps if things are running smoothly, lol). They usually want to know things like how many shooters, how many zeroed, how many qualified (today, yesterday, since start of mission), what's your goal for each day in the big picture and how's your progress on making that happen. They may ask one stump-the-chump question like where your fire extinguishers are located around the ammo, but for the most part they won't care about the minute details of your operation.

    Another thing that will jump out at them and they'll see if as soon as they show up - What do you have set aside for cadets who aren't shooting? If you plan to push the BN out for multiple days, that's a lot of sitting around time - either split your unit up, or find alternate training to conduct. This will usually stem from who's available - if you have NCOs, go into tactics, if you have a spare officer around, see if you can get some OPD going. Preferrably something you guys HAVEN'T done a million times before with the same instructor.

    Sorry about the rambling, but I hope this helps.

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    Senior Member Grunt Medic TXARNG's Avatar
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    Senior NCO Notes:

    Do NOT try (or allow your firers to try) to reset the rifles to 'mechanical zero' before firing them - the previous firer's zero is nearly ALWAYS a better starting point, unless he or she was a complete moron (and those are few, thankfully), or unless the rear sight got run all the way to one side for cleaning - and you need to check your rifles for that before issuing them.

    Ensure that whoever does your PMI stresses ad nauseum the importance of focusing one's eye on the front sight (if shooting irons) or of dialing the intensity level of the red dot down to where it can just be clearly seen (if using red dot sights). The majority of new shooters who have trouble are doing this step wrong.

    Whoever is giving your range commands (probably your NCOIC) should be reading from a script - have it printed out and waterproofed (the script is in the rifle marksmanship field manual, which you need to download and read if you haven't already) - laminated is best, but document protectors will work in all but a downpour. If possible, ask if you can run the line for one iteration - you probably never will again, but the experience will be invaluable when you are supervising ranges in the future.

    Bring extra sandbags and an e-tool if you can - often sandbags on the range have broken down until they're nearly unusable. Line the sandbag with a plastic trash can liner, and it'll last a LOT longer than unlined ones.

    Try to have a couple of extra sets of 'loaner' eye protection and ear protection on hand for those who invariably forget them. Collect a driver license or ID card for each set you loan out - that will make sure you get them back.

    Lastly - some elements of the OPORD have changed recently - ensure you are using a current template.

    Let us know how you are doing, and if we can help in any way. Pics posted here are always appreciated after operations, when possible.

    Good luck!
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    Send me a PM with your email and I will send you and opord from my ARM range. You will have to tweak it a bit but it is current and applicable to a training environment.
    War is an ugly thing, but not the ugliest of things. The decayed and degraded state of moral and patriotic feeling which thinks that nothing is worth war is much worse. The person who has nothing for which he is willing to fight, nothing which is more important than his own personal safety, is a miserable creature and has no chance of being free unless made and kept so by the exertions of better men than himself.
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    Sorry for the delay everyone, my computer sh%t the bed and I just got my new one in. Between now and then I got everything done, luckily earlier because there was a scheduling conflict and our range day was pushed up a week earlier.. Just wanted to thank you all very much for the help and useful hints/ tips, everything was a success and ran flawlessly; everyone who needed to qualified and all cadets in attendance familiarized with reflexive fires..

    Thanks again!

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