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Thread: Shin Splints

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    Senior Member LoneStarMedic's Avatar
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    Default Shin Splints

    I have recently had some pretty much shin splits (or pain on the front of my lower leg), I'm pretty sure they are shin splints but I don't know with certainty as I have never had shin splints before. Are there any ways to treat them? They only start hurting after moderate exercise (running, plyometrics, etc.) and only after I've stopped completely. In most cases, if I keep running and working out they don't hurt as bad. Yesterday, after an Insanity workout, I couldn't walk without limping and my legs were shaking after the workout during leg stretches. I iced them while sitting down and the pain was manageable after about 5-10 minutes. I've been told it's my shoes, but they're plenty broken in and I've been using different types. I'm really worried that this will become a common ocurrance for my and will really cause me problems at Air Assault. Maybe it's due to the intensity of my workouts and lack of adequate rest (the past two weeks I've been working out hard monday-saturday). Any help/advise would be great thanks.
    CDT/E-5 M.
    68W Combat Medic/09R SMP Cadet
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    "Dum Spiramus Tuebimur"

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    Member Solrider's Avatar
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    I'm speaking strictly as a Licensed Massage Therapist here. Shin splints are pretty common with recurring exercise, especially running or hiking. Most people who do those activities have them but they don't know it until someone like me comes along and starts digging in there. The fact that you are feeling them this intensely after working out makes it sound like its been building up for a while. Your friends are right it could be something as simple as your shoes, maybe you need insoles, maybe something is going on with your gait. Ice and ibuprofen are helpful in the short term, but my advice is to seek out a Neuromuscular Therapist, or an LMT who is NMT trained. Not swedish massage...you need someone who is going to get in there and break those adhesions and trigger points up. Sure wish I was closer to help you out! Be well!

    PS: Forgot to mention two other things that might help. First of all, stretch, stretch, stretch! Tibalis Anterior is an easy muscle to stretch. Just have your leg extended while lying down and point your toes. Hold for 10 seconds, then relax, and repeat 3 times twice daily. Also, stop by Target or wherever and grab a foam roller. This will probably hurt but start rolling your shins. The foam roller will act to release the fascia and break up those adhesions until you can make it to an NMT.
    Last edited by Solrider; 06-15-2012 at 09:42 PM.
    Arizona ARNG
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    2012/12- AIT - Ft. Leonard Wood

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    The Chopping Block papachop's Avatar
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    Senior Member LoneStarMedic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Solrider View Post
    I'm speaking strictly as a Licensed Massage Therapist here. Shin splints are pretty common with recurring exercise, especially running or hiking. Most people who do those activities have them but they don't know it until someone like me comes along and starts digging in there. The fact that you are feeling them this intensely after working out makes it sound like its been building up for a while. Your friends are right it could be something as simple as your shoes, maybe you need insoles, maybe something is going on with your gait. Ice and ibuprofen are helpful in the short term, but my advice is to seek out a Neuromuscular Therapist, or an LMT who is NMT trained. Not swedish massage...you need someone who is going to get in there and break those adhesions and trigger points up. Sure wish I was closer to help you out! Be well!

    PS: Forgot to mention two other things that might help. First of all, stretch, stretch, stretch! Tibalis Anterior is an easy muscle to stretch. Just have your leg extended while lying down and point your toes. Hold for 10 seconds, then relax, and repeat 3 times twice daily. Also, stop by Target or wherever and grab a foam roller. This will probably hurt but start rolling your shins. The foam roller will act to release the fascia and break up those adhesions until you can make it to an NMT.
    Thanks! I'm trying to take it easy this weekend and not do anything physical so my legs will have a chance to rest. I hope it's not something too serious. Like I said, I've never gotten them before even during intense PT at BCT/AIT, ruck marches, Air Assault training, crossfit, etc. I will keep an eye out though for a foam roller and some specialists to see if it gets really bad. Thanks again, you should've gone 68 series LOL
    CDT/E-5 M.
    68W Combat Medic/09R SMP Cadet
    HHB 3/133 FA
    56 IBCT
    TX ARNG
    "Dum Spiramus Tuebimur"

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    Short Timer CWO Sharkey's Avatar
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    A 68W that cannot fix himself??
    Iraq/Afghanistan Veteran (OIF V & OEF X & XIII)
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    Moderator MPclk2006's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CWO Sharkey View Post
    A 68W that cannot fix himself??
    That was my first thought...
    It is difficult to be a good noncommissioned officer. If it had been easy,
    they would have given it to the officer corps.- SMA William A. Connelly

    "If someone that outranks you tells you to go jump in a lake, I want you to come talk to me...but you better be wet!"

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    Moderator MSG Glenn's Avatar
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    "The physician that treats himself has a fool for a doctor". Old saying , Chief. I wonder of that applies to Combat Medics as well, lol.
    Proud Dad of a US Army Airborne Ranger SFC
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    Former USN - Submarines, USS Chopper (SS 342) & Navy Diver, UDT 21
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    Senior Member LoneStarMedic's Avatar
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    LOL Shin-splints aren't exactly trauma-related which is my bread and butter. I actually asked myself what I would've told someone else if they came up to me complaining of shin splints, so I just iced them and took some pain-killer. But none of that is worth the time if you don't figure out/treat the cause(s)
    CDT/E-5 M.
    68W Combat Medic/09R SMP Cadet
    HHB 3/133 FA
    56 IBCT
    TX ARNG
    "Dum Spiramus Tuebimur"

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    Moderator MSG Glenn's Avatar
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    That's easy enough to fix - have someone work over your shins with a sledge hammer causing massive trauma. Then you can work on it yourself.

    Since I never suffered from shin splints after 27 years of military service I think I can attribute it to a trick I was taught shortly after I got into UDT training. Place your toes on an elevated surface about the height of a road curb one foot at a time. Keeping your leg straight lean forward slowly but not too much. Feel the pull. Hold it for maybe a half a minute. Switch legs. Repeat.
    Proud Dad of a US Army Airborne Ranger SFC
    Retired US Army 1SG/MSG, Airborne Infantry, G-3, Instructor
    Former USN - Submarines, USS Chopper (SS 342) & Navy Diver, UDT 21
    I was a Soldier. I am a Soldier. I will always be a Soldier.

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    Member Solrider's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LoneStarMedic View Post
    Thanks again, you should've gone 68 series LOL
    My original intent was to go 68W and eventually move into the PA program, but the slot closed before I could get down to MEPS. Now I'm on a different, but equally as interesting path. Its funny what direction life takes you sometime.

    Feel better!
    Arizona ARNG
    12Y in the Making
    2012/09 - BCT - FT. Sill
    2012/12- AIT - Ft. Leonard Wood

    "Who is the happier man, he who has braved the storm of life and lived or he who has stayed securely on shore and merely existed?" - Hunter S. Thompson

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