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Thread: Split Hand/Eye Dominance Issues

  1. #1
    Senior Member LoneStarMedic's Avatar
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    Default Split Hand/Eye Dominance Issues

    Hey all, I have a quick question. Maybe it's been covered before and I've been told various ways of dealing with this issue but here it is: I am right-handed but left-eye dominant. When firing weapons right-handed obviously you have to aim down the sights with your right eye, but for me I can see a lot better with my left eye, so much so in-fact that it has started to affect how I do at zeroing targets. My eye sight isn't horrible but I'm farsighted and have a stigmatism so it's not perfect either. I've been told just to learn to learn to shoot right and left handed, to shoot right-handed but aim with my right eye (which I don't see how that can work), to maybe consider LASIK eye surgery or some other corrective means for my vision and just to learn to live with it. Does anyone else suffer from this? What have you done to rectify this? Thanks!
    CDT/E-5 M.
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  • #2
    Senior Member Angriff's Avatar
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    I've got the same thing; right handed and left eye dominant. I just shoot left handed at ranges, and hold the M4 right handed when doing room clearing training. M9 ranges I also use my left eye. Grunt might have better info or advice, but I just live with it.
    TANKER - That dusty, crusty, grease-covered, dirty, sweaty, bright-eyed, fuzzie-faced,
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  • #3
    Short Timer CWO Sharkey's Avatar
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    How have you been shooting since basic? How many ranges have you been to since then? In the Marines, we use to put an index card over the eye that should not be your normal dominant eye while shooting or have both eyes open.

    TRANSITION: The first steps in effective employment of the RCO are understanding its nomenclature and mounting procedures. The design of the scope requires that it be employed in a specific way to maximize these design features. We will discuss these employment methods.


    3. (25 MIN) RCO EMPLOYMENT METHODS

    a. Bindon Aiming Concept (BAC). A scope with an illuminated aiming point and magnification employs what is called the Bindon Aiming Concept.

    1) Human vision is based upon a binocular presentation of visual information to the brain – this means that the brain processes what is seen through both eyes. The RCO is designed to present a binocular view of the target. Therefore, the RCO is designed to shoot with both eyes open. (A traditional scope presents a monocular view – that is why one eye is closed to shoot.)

    (ON SLIDE #12)

    3) With both eyes open, when the weapon is moved, the brain picks up the chevron in the dominant eye through the optic. The brain picks up the target and background via the non-dominant eye. During dynamic movement, the scene through the telescope blurs because the image moves more rapidly due to magnification. The dominant eye sees the bright chevron against the blurred target scene, so the brain picks the scene from the unaided eye.

    3) The brain actually merges the two images. As soon as the weapon begins to become steady in the target area, the brain switches to the magnified view of the target.

    b. Dominant-eye Shooting. To use the RCO to its maximum potential, you should shoot with both eyes open and use your dominate eye to look through the optic.

    1) Procedures for Determining Dominant Eye. To determine dominant eye, perform the following steps:

    a) Have another Marine stand in front of you approximately 5 – 7 feet away. With both eyes open, look at the Marine and extend your hands at eye level out to the sides of your body.

    (ON SLIDE #13)

    b) While keeping the hands extended, slowly bring your two hands together, forming a small triangle out in front of your face.

    c) The Marine standing in front of you will determine which eye is dominant. If he sees your right eye in the small triangle, you are right-eye dominant. You can confirm this by closing your left eye – you should be able to see the Marine through the triangle with your right eye.

    2) Shooting Adjustment. Marines who are cross-eye dominant, meaning they are use their non-dominant eye behind the optic, will experience a shift in point of impact when shooting using both eyes open.

    a) The amount of shift will be based on the disparity between the dominant and non-dominant eye.
    b) If you cannot shoot using the dominant eye behind the optic, keep your dominant eye closed. The downside to this approach is a loss of peripheral vision.

    c. Both Eyes Open Shooting. At close ranges (e.g., 0 – 100 yards), keeping both eyes open increases situational awareness. In addition, at close ranges there is a natural tendency to look at the target and, therefore, shoot with both eyes open.

    d. Longer Range Shooting

    1) At longer ranges, 300 yards and out, shoot with one eye closed to focus on the reticle of the RCO. At these ranges, accurate sight picture is more critical to accurate shooting.

    2) Past 300 yards, the horizontal stadia lines are used as the aiming point. These lines are black and not illuminated, so they must be focused on to establish sight picture.

    e. Importance of Presentation. Presentation is critical to quick and accurate target acquisition.

    (ON SLIDE #14)

    1) Consistent placement of the buttstock in the shoulder will assist in achieving a consistent stock weld and eye relief. Improper stock weld can cause scope shadow, which can result in improper shot placement.

    2) If the butt of the rifle is placed in the shoulder correctly and stock weld is correct, the shooter should be looking through the optic as the rifle is presented. As the rifle levels, the shooter should pick up the chevron and establish sight picture.

    (ON SLIDES #15 - #17)

    f. Windage Adjustments. Unlike the adjustable iron sights on the service rifle/carbine, the RCO should not be adjusted for a wind change. The windage turrets on the RCO should only be adjusted during zeroing. For wind corrections during firing, a slight hold into the direction of the wind will produce the desired result. Employ an offset aiming method by aiming an equal amount opposite the strike of the round.
    Iraq/Afghanistan Veteran (OIF V & OEF X & XIII)
    101st Airborne Division & 4th Infantry Division combat vet
    Serving overseas

  • #4
    Short Timer CWO Sharkey's Avatar
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    Default

    How have you been shooting since basic? How many ranges have you been to since then? In the Marines, we use to put an index card over the eye that should not be your normal dominant eye while shooting.

    TRANSITION: The first steps in effective employment of the RCO are understanding its nomenclature and mounting procedures. The design of the scope requires that it be employed in a specific way to maximize these design features. We will discuss these employment methods.


    3. (25 MIN) RCO EMPLOYMENT METHODS

    a. Bindon Aiming Concept (BAC). A scope with an illuminated aiming point and magnification employs what is called the Bindon Aiming Concept.

    1) Human vision is based upon a binocular presentation of visual information to the brain – this means that the brain processes what is seen through both eyes. The RCO is designed to present a binocular view of the target. Therefore, the RCO is designed to shoot with both eyes open. (A traditional scope presents a monocular view – that is why one eye is closed to shoot.)

    (ON SLIDE #12)

    3) With both eyes open, when the weapon is moved, the brain picks up the chevron in the dominant eye through the optic. The brain picks up the target and background via the non-dominant eye. During dynamic movement, the scene through the telescope blurs because the image moves more rapidly due to magnification. The dominant eye sees the bright chevron against the blurred target scene, so the brain picks the scene from the unaided eye.

    3) The brain actually merges the two images. As soon as the weapon begins to become steady in the target area, the brain switches to the magnified view of the target.

    b. Dominant-eye Shooting. To use the RCO to its maximum potential, you should shoot with both eyes open and use your dominate eye to look through the optic.

    1) Procedures for Determining Dominant Eye. To determine dominant eye, perform the following steps:

    a) Have another Marine stand in front of you approximately 5 – 7 feet away. With both eyes open, look at the Marine and extend your hands at eye level out to the sides of your body.

    (ON SLIDE #13)

    b) While keeping the hands extended, slowly bring your two hands together, forming a small triangle out in front of your face.

    c) The Marine standing in front of you will determine which eye is dominant. If he sees your right eye in the small triangle, you are right-eye dominant. You can confirm this by closing your left eye – you should be able to see the Marine through the triangle with your right eye.

    2) Shooting Adjustment. Marines who are cross-eye dominant, meaning they are use their non-dominant eye behind the optic, will experience a shift in point of impact when shooting using both eyes open.

    a) The amount of shift will be based on the disparity between the dominant and non-dominant eye.
    b) If you cannot shoot using the dominant eye behind the optic, keep your dominant eye closed. The downside to this approach is a loss of peripheral vision.

    c. Both Eyes Open Shooting. At close ranges (e.g., 0 – 100 yards), keeping both eyes open increases situational awareness. In addition, at close ranges there is a natural tendency to look at the target and, therefore, shoot with both eyes open.

    d. Longer Range Shooting

    1) At longer ranges, 300 yards and out, shoot with one eye closed to focus on the reticle of the RCO. At these ranges, accurate sight picture is more critical to accurate shooting.

    2) Past 300 yards, the horizontal stadia lines are used as the aiming point. These lines are black and not illuminated, so they must be focused on to establish sight picture.

    e. Importance of Presentation. Presentation is critical to quick and accurate target acquisition.

    (ON SLIDE #14)

    1) Consistent placement of the buttstock in the shoulder will assist in achieving a consistent stock weld and eye relief. Improper stock weld can cause scope shadow, which can result in improper shot placement.

    2) If the butt of the rifle is placed in the shoulder correctly and stock weld is correct, the shooter should be looking through the optic as the rifle is presented. As the rifle levels, the shooter should pick up the chevron and establish sight picture.

    (ON SLIDES #15 - #17)

    f. Windage Adjustments. Unlike the adjustable iron sights on the service rifle/carbine, the RCO should not be adjusted for a wind change. The windage turrets on the RCO should only be adjusted during zeroing. For wind corrections during firing, a slight hold into the direction of the wind will produce the desired result. Employ an offset aiming method by aiming an equal amount opposite the strike of the round.
    Iraq/Afghanistan Veteran (OIF V & OEF X & XIII)
    101st Airborne Division & 4th Infantry Division combat vet
    Serving overseas

  • #5
    Short Timer CWO Sharkey's Avatar
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    Iraq/Afghanistan Veteran (OIF V & OEF X & XIII)
    101st Airborne Division & 4th Infantry Division combat vet
    Serving overseas

  • #6
    The Chopping Block papachop's Avatar
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    Also right handed\left eye dominant. I haven't figured out how to deal with it yet. It feels too awkward trying to shoot left-handed after I've shot right for so long...
    1LT Papa Chop
    Executive Officer (25A)

    Quote Originally Posted by GEN Dwight D. Eisenhower
    “The one quality that can be developed by studious reflection and practice is the leadership of men

  • #7
    Senior Member LoneStarMedic's Avatar
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    The vision in my right eye is pretty bad as well making it even more difficult to sight out of that eye. What I used to do at the qualifying ranges with the M16A2 was just keep both eyes open when scanning for targets while keeping my cheek/face in the same spot of the rifle as if firing, and when a target popped up I would just close my left eye and fire. It worked for me, got me Sharpshooter lol
    CDT/E-5 M.
    68W Combat Medic/09R SMP Cadet
    HHB 3/133 FA
    56 IBCT
    TX ARNG
    "Dum Spiramus Tuebimur"

  • #8
    Senior Member Angriff's Avatar
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    Like I said up there I'm right handed / left eye dominant. Been shooting left handed since basic. Went to an M4 range last week and just completely forgot I needed to shoot left handed until I was done zeroing. At this point I just decided to roll with it, shoot right handed, and see what happened.

    Everything was fine.
    TANKER - That dusty, crusty, grease-covered, dirty, sweaty, bright-eyed, fuzzie-faced,
    haircut-needing, beer-drinking, underrated, over-worked, underpaid,
    oversexed, little shit, who can take a tank and do more battlefield damage in
    ten minutes than a Grunt squad can do all day.

    If you ain't Armor, you ain't shit.

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